There are many verbs in Japanese formed by thought a combination of two verbs—the equivalent of phrasal verbs in English, e.g. to take back, to calm down, to keep on doing, etc. In Japanese these “joint verbs” are formed by taking the stem of one verb and adding another. Here are some examples:

Verb I Verb II Phrasal Verb
もど もど
to take to return to take back
Verb I Verb II Phrasal Verb
to cut to let out to cut out
Verb I Verb II Phrasal Verb
ちる ける ける
to fall to fix to settle down
Verb I Verb II Phrasal Verb
ける れる れる
to accept to put in to come to terms with
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