This residence in the backstreets of Shibamata was once the home of Yamamoto Einosuke, a businessman who made his fortune through the manufacture of camera parts and moved to Shibamata after the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923 destroyed his home. The house draws on elements of both Japanese and Western architecture, and is one of the best examples of sukiya-zukuri—a typical Japanese design for homes with origins in the early Edo period. The thin shoji panels throughout the house, as well as the glass exterior walls through which visitors can view the beautiful Japanese garden, all serve to create a sense of spaciousness and tranquility.

The building was acquired by Katsushika City Ward in 1988 and opened to the public in March 1991. The main living space is used as a tea room where visitors can drink matcha while looking out onto the garden or (on certain days) enjoying a traditional performance.

Information
Location
Yamamoto-tei, 7 Chome-19-32 Shibamata, Katsushika City, Tokyo 125-0052
« Google Maps »
Getting there
10 minutes from Shibamata Station (turn right at Taishakuten Temple)
Details
9:00-17:00. Closed on the 3rd Tuesday of each month.
Adults ¥400. Under 16s free.
You May Also Like

Yamate District

Yamate was the area where foreigners lived in the years after Yokohama port opened for trade. Harbour View Park located at the top of the hill provides one of the best views of Yokohama port and also has a rose garden and Western-style cemetery. You can walk up the hill from the Motomachi shopping district to the view point at the top which looks over the Minato Mirai area.

Glover Garden

Garden in Nagasaki housing the former home of Thomas Glover

Hachiko Memorial Statue

A bronze statue of a small dog by the name of Hachiko that is one of Tokyo’s most well-known landmarks.

Osanbashi Pier & Passenger Terminal

Osanbashi Pier was built in the late 19th century to facilitate the loading and unloading of the ships that came into the Yokohama port. Today boarding gates and shops can be found beneath the modern wooden walkway, but many on the pier are just there for the view looking back onto Yokohama.