Although “chaya” (茶屋) literally means teahouse, they were actually establishments during the Edo period where guests would go to be entertained by geisha. They congregated in what are more often referred to as the “pleasure quarters” and Kanazawa has three of these chaya districts—Higashi Chayagai (ひがし茶屋街), Nishi Chayagai (にし茶屋街) and Kazuemachi (主計町)—but of these Higashi Chayagai is the largest and the most popular with visiting tourists. The photograph down the main street is another iconic shot of Kanazawa, and probably the image most used in travel guide books for the city.

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Kyu Asakura House

Taisho period property with a beautiful Japanese garden

Kanazawa Castle

Home of the powerful Maeda family who governed the region for 280 years from the late 16th century up until the end of the Edo period. Since its early days, the castle has been pivotal to Kanazawa and the city has developed around it.

Osanbashi Pier & Passenger Terminal

Osanbashi Pier was built in the late 19th century to facilitate the loading and unloading of the ships that came into the Yokohama port. Today boarding gates and shops can be found beneath the modern wooden walkway, but many on the pier are just there for the view looking back onto Yokohama.

Dutch Slope

Stone-paved path leading to an area of Nagasaki where many foreigners lived from the latter half of the…