Kagurazaka was once the playground of Tokyo’s political elite and the role of Akagi Shrine was centered around providing support for this community. However, as times changed and Kagurazaka began to see a second life as a more cosmopolitan area, the shrine’s austere image seemed out of place. As a result, it underwent a complete renovation in 2010 under the guidance of the architect Kuma Kengo, resulting in a very modern take on a traditional Shinto shrine. A restaurant and gallery space called Akagi Cafe also opened next door, and once a month a food market is held in the shrine’s grounds.

The walk up to the shrine
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Location
Akagi Shrine, 1-10 Akagi Motomachi, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0817
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